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Thread: MTG & scratches/mud fever

  1. #1
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    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    I've read about some who use MTG for mud fever. What is the common practice when using it? Can it be used on broken skin?

  2. #2

    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    I use MTG for 99% of the time if my horse has a case of mud fever. If it isn't working - I go to special formula or add on the x-cellerate cream to the MTG treatment for the more stubborn cases (basically just like that yellow stuff that is at the bottom of the MTG bottle).

    I apply MTG once or twice a week during muddy seasons and that seems to help keep the mud fever away. Knock on wood but this year he has been mud fever free so far since I started doing this.

    As for broken skin- are you pulling the scabs off? It isn't usually recommended. Although I was told that you had to in order to make the treatment effective- simply not true! It hurts them when you pull them off and I find the mud fever tends to spead more.

    If you're not touching the scabs and the broken skin happened for another reason, I wouldn't use the MTG on it. I would imagine it would burn- I don't have the bottle in front of me so see if it tells you not to use it on broken skin...

    You can gently rub the scabs off if they are almost coming off. In that case- I am no vet- but I would assume that when the scab is really loose- it means that the skin underneath is all healed up. Usually - rule of thumb is if it doesn't feel like it wants to come off when I rub it- its not ready to come off.

    Be sure to shake the MTG bottle really good- you don't want to see the yellow sulfur stuff at the bottom. Be generous- during a bad season of mud fever- between two horses we went through three bottles (It was a horrible season!). Now- we just use it for preventitive measures to ensure that it doesn't happen again.

    Hope this helps! The above situation- is based on my experience and I know that there will be others that have different experiences, opinions or methods. Do find what works for you and give it time (max a week? depending on how long the horse has had mud fever- I find the longer the horse has had it, the longer it will take to go away).


  3. #3
    Been There, Done That, Got the Tshirt SnickerDoodles's Avatar
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    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    This is interesting, I would have never thought of MTG for mud fever..

    I have been dealing with a particular tricky case and nothing I have done seems to be working. It will go semi-away for a bit but then pop right back up, very frustrating!! I'll give the MTG a try. Thanks for the tip!!

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    Seduced By The Power cressiegirl's Avatar
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    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    I don't use it on broken skin but I have used it for normal scabs and it's been quite effective. It just seems like the type of product that wouldn't feel too good in a wound to me, so if the skin is broken I will use a wound cream instead.

  5. #5

    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    I haven't fount MTG to be very effective with mud fever...

    You don't have to pick the scabs of (and you never want to) to make any topical solution effective, but you do want it clean. I usually clean it with a medicated shampoo once every 2-3 days, let it dry really well and apply panalog (you can get it from your vet). I put panalog on twice a day and the mud fever is usually gone within a week, even bad cases. The stuff is kinda expensive, but it sure does work!! You'll find the scabs will fall off as you apply the panalog and every few days when you wash it, it will clean right up with no broken skin and the hair will grow back quickly.

  6. #6
    Been There, Done That, Got the Tshirt
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    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    I haven't fount MTG to be very effective with mud fever...
    Ditto! :yes:

    It may however be that my cases of mud fever are a little "weird" in relation to the TBs compromised immune system. For me, its a case of prevention rather then treatment ...

    The TBs treatment generally includes clipping the sock, picking scabs, betadine bath, then dry and slather with baby butt cream + a full round of antibiotics. Ick.
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  7. #7

    MTG & scratches/mud fever



    As for broken skin- are you pulling the scabs off? It isn&#39;t usually recommended. Although I was told that you had to in order to make the treatment effective- simply not true&#33; It hurts them when you pull them off and I find the mud fever tends to spead more.
    Unfortunately, with mud fever the bacteria hide under the scabs, so you need to remove them in order to treat the source. Not a pleasant task by any means, but if you want your scrubbing to be effective, it&#39;s quite necessary.
    ​The plural of anecdote is not data

  8. #8

    MTG & scratches/mud fever



    As for broken skin- are you pulling the scabs off?  It isn&#39;t usually recommended.  Although I was told that you had to in order to make the treatment effective- simply not true&#33;  It hurts them when you pull them off and I find the mud fever tends to spead more. 
    Unfortunately, with mud fever the bacteria hide under the scabs, so you need to remove them in order to treat the source. Not a pleasant task by any means, but if you want your scrubbing to be effective, it&#39;s quite necessary.
    Very good point to mention in the battle of mud fever. While I was told that each scab must be removed in order to make the treatment more effective because you want to treat the skin underneath (like you meantion)- it just didn&#39;t work.

    The best method- for me and my horse- was to crack the scab (using my finger nails) and put the treatment underneath. Kept it under control a lot better (no spreading) and then the next day, the scab was much looser and easier to remove without causing pain to my horse.

    I spent weeks doing the scab removal and everytime I went back out- it was bigger and worse. When I got fed up removing the scabs, I started to just crack them open to get the treatment underneath without removing any scabs that is really attached to his skin. The ones that were really loose could come off. By doing it this way- the mud fever cleared up in less than a week. Lesson learnt&#33;

    I think one should investigate all means that will work the best for the horse and the type/level of mud fever one has...


  9. #9
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    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    Ruckus, I think part of why that worked for you was that the scab would have been softened by whatever you were putting under them. Thusly, they come off more easily :) You can do that merely by soaking the scabs and peeling them when they are soft. But you have to dry the affected area completely afterwards.

    And keep in mind there are different types of mud fever, each needing to be treated differently; bacterial and fungal are the two, if I remember correctly ... so, one should keep in mind that their selection of treatment may work for one type of mud fever, but not the other :yes:
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  10. #10
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    MTG & scratches/mud fever

    Yep. Bacterial - scrub, pick, treat. Fungal - limited scrubbing, treat without picking.

    I had only ever dealt with the bacterial form until about five years ago when the brat got a case of fungal. My treatments just made things worse, so when I had my QH in for his hock injection I told the vet about it. I described the area and specifically how it differed from what I usually saw, that the usual treatment (betadine scrub, pick, treat) wasn&#39;t helping at all, and the vet instantly knew it was fungal and gave me Panalog with specific instructions to leave the scabs alone - NO picking. And as the Panalog did it&#39;s job the scabs would just rub off as I applied the night&#39;s treatment.

    The scabs, when clean, look very different from each other. Bacterial has big thick reddish, orange scabs that crack and ooze serum. These can be scrubbed and picked off leaving raw patches of skin. Fungal, in the beginning are very thin, flat, soft, near white patches which are pretty well impossible to get off. When left they go black, thicken, and crack with no oozing, but if picked off (with much effort) they bleed freely.
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